Category: Graphic Design

19
Feb

Oh Crap!

I started work on the 2nd of January 1985 and I remember it like it was yesterday. Resplendent in grey Fletcher Jones pants, a cream and blue checked shirt and a pale green square bottom tie, I turned up at an Agricultural Business in Liverpool Street full of trepidation and reported to the Senior Livestock Clerk. I was to be the Junior Livestock Clerk, responsible for for all the crap jobs the Senior Livestock clerk didn’t want to do which was fair enough, he was after all the Senior livestock clerk.

One of those duties was recording livestock sales at the Bridgewater sale yards and running sales sheets to and from the auctioneer. To get to Bridgewater I’d have to cadge a lift with whichever Stock Agent was going by at the time which was OK- in the main they were good down to earth people keen to teach the city boy about the rural way of life and I had some great conversations and more than a few laughs going to and fro from the saleyards. Except for one guy, an Agent from down the Huon – maybe it was the pastel tie or my too long hair, but he took a dislike to me and delighted in making me uncomfortable. He even made me sit in the back seat of his vehicle, his dog taking pride of place in the front passenger seat whenever in his words he “drew the short straw” and had to give me a lift.

This was also the era that Normie Gallagher and the BLF were flexing their considerable muscle, despite some questionable and often violent means they and the union movement in general had gathered some real impetus and were knocking heads with the establishment all over the country. Of course a conservative Pastoral and Agricultural business considered itself to be part of the Establishment and any talk of joining a union was dealt with quicker than Warnie can scoff a pie.

So predictably things between me and the Huon agent came to a head and I had no recourse or protection from the company. Tired of the constant bullying, I started reacting which he in turn saw as insolence and our relationship reached a new low.

Then came the shittiest work day I have ever had – literally! Not exactly spritely on my feet at the best of times, I was running sales sheets to the auctioneer on a cold and rainy day when my feet went out from under me in one of the empty cattle races. I must have slid about 5 or six metres, throwing a few rolls in as I went through stuff I didn’t want to think about. If sliding in shit infused mud was an olympic sport I might have been marked down for style but still would have made the podium! I was covered from head to toe, stank like I’d been synchronised swimming in a sewer and I still had three hours to go at the saleyards before I could leave.

I cleaned myself off as best as I could, got through the next three hours, willing the clock to go faster so I could get home and change before heading back to work. Of course the Agents were all aware of my predicament so when the auction was over the sound of roaring engines and wheels spinning from the carpark was palpable. The Huon Agent had been waylaid by a client and was hastily nominated by the others, over two way radios from the safety of the road, to get me home.

Relegated to the backseat again and sitting on old tarps it was a pretty miserable drive back with not so subtle obscene mutterings coming from the drivers seat. At least the dog was showing more interest in me!

Then came his coup de gras. The car came to a sudden halt at Franklin Square and I was ordered out and told to find my own way home. Refused by taxi drivers and with well over an hour to wait for the next bus, which may have refused me anyway, I was forced to trudge three kilometres home covered in crap with my head down hoping that nobody would recognise me.

At that stage I was still two months shy of my eighteenth birthday and the lessons learned have stayed with me to this day. Treat others in the workplace with fairness, equality and respect and join a bloody union!

Which brings me to….

Resilience are proud to have worked with the National Tertiary Education Union. We helped them create some public awareness recently surrounding some UTAS practices through cinema advertising and outdoor advertising on our Superscreen.

Cinema Advertising:

Outdoor Advertising:

 

13
Feb

The not so humble Flattie

Some of my happiest days were spent at Swansea during school holidays as a kid. Our family were part of the temporary summer wave of “blow ins” that descended on the idyllic little town on Tassies East Coast every summer, setting up residence in our caravan which was permanently on site at the imaginatively named Swansea Caravan Park.

Long summer days were filled with beach cricket, table tennis and space invaders when it was raining, scarfing down hot buttered buns straight out of the oven from the local bakery and riding bikes with the posse all over town and beyond.

My favourite thing to do though was to get out on the water in Great Oyster Bay with my old man in his tinnie and fish for flathead. Back in those days if you put a line in with three hooks on it you’d pull in three fish and have three others chasing them up as you reeled it in. Most of the time there were a few of us in the boat, my sisters and brother often came out too which was great but I cherished the times it was just me and Dad drifting quietly in a comfortable silence while we waited for the next bite.

It wasn’t always beer and skittles though, sometimes the weather would come up unexpectedly and the gentle swell that had been lulling me into an almost hypnotic state would turn quickly into something more akin to a wave pool and result in a white knuckle ride back into shore. Or the time the engine wouldn’t start and the old man had to row from Dolphin Sands back to Swansea, a feat that to this day remains vivid in my memory.

It was a good feeling chowing down on barbecued Flathead fillets in the evening with the family knowing that I had helped put food on the table.

These days the humble Flathead, once considered the rat of the sea (albeit a tasty one!) are a lot harder to find and sell for upwards of $55/kg. The days of reeling them in as easily as shelling peas are long gone and the locals that know how and where to find them guard their secret spots jealously.

Of course to grab a few you need a boat, which is my segue into this weeks featured client – Mariner Aluminium Custom Boats.

A family business, based in Murdunna south east of Hobart, They manufacture and refit quality Aluminium Boats for domestic and commercial use.

Resilience redesigned their logo, designed and printed their stickers and developed a web site for them. check them out below:

 

 

Logo Design

Graphic  Design

Stickers:

Web Design

Visit Site: http://marineraluminiumboats.com.au/

05
Feb

The Freestone Identity

Now here’s a project we could really sink our teeth into. New Identity, new web site and all the trimmings.

Business cards, letterhead, signage and presentation folders were all items we designed around the new Corporate identity we developed for Freestone Building Surveying.

We love crafting new logos and branding for businesses. It gives us a real kick seeing our creative efforts go by on a vehicle or drive past offices adorned with signage we have created.

The work we have done for Freestone Building Surveying is no exception. Check out the logo, stationery and web site below.

Graphic Design

Business Cards

 

  

Letterhead and Folder

 

Vehicle Signage:

 

Branding

Web Design

Visit Site: http://www.freestonebuildingsurveying.com.au/

16
Jan

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year! Here’s hoping 2018 is a prosperous and happy one for all of our valued clients and friends around Hobart and beyond.

What better way to kick off the year than a shout out to an organisation that we have done a lot of work with who do great work on behalf of their members and the community in general.

We’ve been working with RSL Tasmania for some time now – we publish their On Service magazine, designed and developed their web site and have completed numerous graphic design and advertising projects for them over the years.

The RSL was founded in 1916 to provide comradeship and support to Australia’s veterans and their families. It’s core objectives are the welfare of war veterans, serving members of the ADF, ex-servicemen and women and their dependants; and to act as an advocacy for them. In addition to this the RSL is committed to Commemoration and Remembrance of those Australians who have given their lives in War and to instill in the Australian people the patriotic, loyalty and pride which the League has for the Nation, it’s people, the Crown and the Flag.

Resilience Marketing are proud to be associated with RSL Tasmania and feel honoured to be trusted with their two main forms of communication to their members – their web site and On Service magazine.

More recently we have also started working with the Hobart RSL Sub-Branch in helping them make people aware of their new digs within the Hobart Workers Club, another Hobart institution. They’re still going strong, still supporting former and serving members and have been doing so for over 100 years.

Resilience have developed a press ad and a joint flyer for them and the Hobart Workers Club to help get the word out. You can check them out below:

Once again happy new year to all – and watch this space for more news from the Resilience team!

 

Press Ad:

Printed DL Flyers

 

27
Nov

The cure for wobbly boots

So these days I’m a little unsteady on my pins. A medical condition has led to muscle wasting in my legs and whilst I can walk around all day on the flat I generally have more than my fair share of stumbles, tumbles and outright nose dives. As a sobriety test though it works pretty well – If I’m out on a big night I blame the first two excursions to the floor on my feet but on the third one it’s “Na you’re pissed, time to call a cab!”

I think the most embarrassing tumble I’ve ever taken though happened in my 20s at Rosny Park Golf Course. As usual the place was packed with fellow hackers, and as usual I was mouthing off to everyone in my group how I was going to give them a golfing lesson. It was a cold, wet day in August and it was my turn to tee off on the third hole. Anybody that ever played Rosny back in those days knows that that was a busy part of the course. It’s a shared tee for the 2nd and 18th holes, The 1st, 3rd and 17th greens are right next to it and it always became a bottleneck with golfers aplenty tapping their feet impatiently waiting to tee off.

So on that day we had the four in my group waiting to go, a group behind us also waiting for the 2nd tee, The same thing happening for the 18th and the surrounding greens full as well – close enough to 30 people hanging around watching me as I stepped up to the tee. I wish I could say that I was a gracious and sportsmanlike figure like the golfers of legend but in reality I was more Happy Gilmour than Jack Nicklaus. Mouthing off was second nature and I did plenty of it before starting my back swing.

That’s where it came unstuck, literally! – my old KT-26s didn’t hold so well in the mud and I could feel my feet going out from under me as the club started it descent towards the ball it was never going to get anywhere near.  Before I knew it I was flat on my back, wallowing in the mud like a prize hog, the club having left my grip and almost decapitating a player on the 17th green, with over a score of previously bored golfers pointing fingers and laughing their heads off.

To add insult to injury I still had 17 holes to play caked in mud and copping  constant and merciless stirring from my mates and the group behind us whenever they caught up which was often! Nearly 30 years later I’m still hearing about it when I catch up with the boys on a Wednesday night.

I don’t reckon Grip Guard could have helped me that day, but these days as someone who’s prone to slipping on wet, loose or slippery surfaces, I find their work invaluable. From massive projects like resurfacing footpaths in St Helens through to residential applications like driveways, paths and wet areas Kim and his team have been making Tasmania safer for all of us.

They’ve been with Resilience for some time now and we’ve completed a web site for them as well as designing their business cards among other projects.

Web Design:

Visit Site

Graphic Design:

 

 

22
Nov

Building Things

This week’s shout out goes to Vos Constructions, the people responsible for the incredible $12 million revamp of the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery among other high profile building projects around the state.

A lesser known, but growing part of their business is shopfitting and they have already assembled an impressive array of clients both here in Tasmania and on that much larger island to our north.

Emirates Leisure Retail Australia (Hudsons Coffee), Luxottica (OPSM, SunglassHut and Laubman and Pank), and Bakers Delights are some of the international and national organisations enjoying the Vos shopfitting experience as well as major pharmacy retail groups such as TerryWhite Chemists, Priceline, Chemmart, Discount Drug Stores and Chemist Outlet.

Resilience were stoked to be asked to develop a magazine ad to publicise their excellent work in the Macq01 Restaurant for the Federal Group recently in addition to the magazine ad we developed for them after their fit out of the Hudsons Coffee outlet at Sydney Airport.

Graphic Design and Magazine Placement:

13
Nov

Be Safe Out There

I come from a long line of country folk. My forebears were robust types that lived through wars, depressions, droughts, floods and other natural disasters with nary a complaint and a practicality borne from just having to get on with it or you won’t be eating anytime soon. They were farmers, graziers and saw millers and I’d like to say their blood courses through my veins but when it comes to farming I’m a card carrying member of City Boys R Us.

When I was growing up we used to visit my country cousins occasionally and the land was always a pleasant place for me to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. My mum once suggested that I spend the summer holidays at my Uncle Bluey’s farm in the mountains instead of the usual swimming, cricket and hanging with my friends and I screamed louder than a millennial who’s lost his wifi.

Of course in this day of tree changes and hobby farming the lines between city folk and country folk have blurred and more and more people are being drawn to the rural or semi-rural lifestyle. Towns like Woodbridge, Cygnet and Huonville which were dying the death of a thousand cuts back in the 90’s have a renewed energy, increased tourism and facilities in the form of restaurants, cafes and B&Bs and cottage industries are booming.

You would think that this exodus of unskilled city people moving to and working farms would lead to an increase of accidents on the land but the opposite is actually occurring. In the late 1980s and early 90s there were an average of nearly 150 accidental farming deaths per year. That number has steadily fallen and last year there were 63.

Education and resources relating to safe farming practices is freely available for hobby farmers and fair dinkum farmers alike and the increased awareness and education is clearly having an impact in keeping people on the land safer.  Resilience are proud to have been involved in producing a raft of materials for Safe Farming Tasmania including an Induction Handbook and accompanying video, printed materials and electronic versions loaded onto a usb stick.

Here’s a look:

 

Corporate Video

Supplied on branded USB drive – here’s an idea of the content

Graphic Design

Business Cards

Stickers

Handbook

Style Guide

06
Nov

The Underdog’s Lament

Walking through a market a couple of weeks ago, I came across an old toy replica of the General Lee from the Dukes of Hazzard.

I didn’t buy it but I irritated my girlfriend no end for the next three hours with Roscoe P Coltrane quotes which gave me infinitely more pleasure :). You know the ones – We’ve got ourselves a hot peeeeerseeuuuute and coo coo coo I hollered gleefully as we followed an old man with a hat on, doing 35 km/h in a circa 1960 Morris Major down Main Rd, New Town.

It dawned on me then that A. if I didn’t drop the redneck “Looosianna” accent soon I’d be single again and B. I’ve always identified with the underdog more than the hero. I don’t even remember the cast of Dukes of Hazzard other than Rosco P Coltrane and Daisy (for obvious reasons!) but I could come up with Rosco quotes ad nauseum. Apparently causing nausea at the same time if the stony silence from the passenger seat was any indication.

Some of the gems that rolled off  my tongue were ” Do you know who I am? I’m Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane and when he tells ya to scoot, he means scoot. That goes for you too you little Turban Tucker” and “Oh, he is stupid! I mean, I mean even the dipsticks call him a dipstick!” Of course I made up quite a few as well in my best Southern accent but stopped when I noticed her googling Dr. Kavorkian on her phone.

Hmm where was I?, Oh that’s right – underdogs.

I was always willing Wylie E. Coyote on, I mean it was a cartoon – why couldn’t the bloody road runner die? – They killed Kenny every week on South Park. Dick Dastardly and Mutley – destined to forever finish second and don’t get me started on Elmer Fudd, poor bugger never did get his wabbit stew!

Curiously though my favourite real life underdog was also a Roscoe – Roscoe Tanner the American tennis player with the massive left handed serve. He won an Australian Open but finished up runner up in the other majors and every other tournament of note. I was a huge tennis fan as a kid and his serve was something to behold when it wasn’t coming back at him quicker than a toupee in a hurricane. Unfortunately for him McEnroe, Connors, Vilas et al were playing in the same era so he didn’t get the chocolates all that often.

Perhaps if he had had a better coach….. nice segue into this weeks featured client. Marty Nidorfer – you guessed it – Tennis Coach!

We designed and printed a brochure for him a little while ago.

Check it out here

31
Oct

Stand Out!

At Resilience we’ve been helping business be seen for over 25 years now.

Once synonymous with the Resilience Report, a budget tv advertising and radio advertising package which helped hundreds of Tasmanian businesses showcase their products and services, Resilience helped pioneer cost effective advertising in the Tasmanian market. Hard to believe that the last Resilience Report aired 10 years ago!

We’re proud of our roots, which made us a household name in Southern Tasmania, but we’ve moved on a bit from those days now.

We are all about finding quality solutions to get our client’s message out to the market place and have added many strings to our bow in order to do this. Having evolved into a full service Advertising Agency, we take a consultative approach with our clients to find the best medium or combination of mediums to ensure their brand rises above the pack. We’ve fully embraced web technology and social media and added them to our more traditional electronic media solutions in addition to one of our fastest growing areas, outdoor advertising.

With our superscreen displaying ads 24/7 at the Elwick Showgrounds and the utilisation of traditional billboards we are literally showcasing hundreds of Tasmanian, National and International brands every day to thousands of people.

To find out how we can help your business give us a call on 03 6224 6888 or use the contact form on this site.

 

09
Oct

A Crying in the Wind

This weeks shout out goes to Elizabeth Fleetwood, a Cornwall native who has been calling Tassie home for 35 years now so I guess we can call her a local!

Elizabeth’s book “A Crying in the Wind” is a sweeping saga, traversing over 200 years of Tasmanian History as told through the interwoven stories of four families beginning in 1812. Well researched, the book really gives you a feel for the harsh realities faced by 19th and 20th century Tasmanians and the struggle faced by our indigenous and immigrant populations.

 

Here’s a brief synopsis as written by the author:

“This epic and sweeping 200-year saga of an ancient island and its violent transformation from Eden-like paradise to the tourist-destination Tasmania of today, is told through the lives of four families.”

The Aboriginal child Tom, stolen in 1812 and forced into early adulthood with no family, no identity, and no love; the hard working Scottish Fairfield family who leave all that is familiar to establish themselves in an alien place; the convict George Turner whose gentleness and conscience are finally destroyed by hard fate; and later the Dijkstras – displaced from Java and then from the Netherlands by WWII – come seeking a new home in the fabled isle that their own Abel Tasman had discovered in 1642. 

In the wake of invasion and genocide, the remnant Aborigines struggle for bare subsistence and recognition on the remote Bass Strait Islands while the pastoral settlers build their empires on someone else’s land; the convict’s sons try to create a new identity, and the Dutch search for peace but bring memories of other wars. All of them are in an alien environment full of ghosts and strange presences.

As their descendants – ordinary people whom you might meet on the streets of Hobart today – interact around the troubled boy Ty, a threatening environmental mystery, and a fiery climax on the slopes of the grand Western Tiers, this is raw history as well as the heart-warming story of ordinary people, loving, hating and battling along in a difficult setting, indelibly marked by their past, yet striving to rise above it and seek redemption.

Well worth a read!

Resilience were approached by Elizabeth to help her market the book a little while ago now. As part of that process we have built a web site and social media presence, designed brochures and screened cinema advertisements for her.

See below:

Web Design:

cryingintthewind-web

Visit Site: http://www.acryinginthewind.com/#steps

Social Media: cryingintthewind-facebook

Visit Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/A-Crying-In-The-Wind-1844977595751627/

 

Cinema Advertising:

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-Screen1-(002)

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-Screen2-(002)

Graphic Design:

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-DL-Flyer-V3

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-A4SETUP-DL-Flyer