Category: TV Advertising

29
Apr

Legacies

So Anzac Day has come and gone for another year and the respect shown for our fallen diggers by subsequent generations of Australians who, by and large, have never known the horrors of warfare once again was incredible.

35,000 people showed up at the War Memorial in Canberra and countless thousands more turned up at hundreds of dawn services and marches across the country.

It got me thinking about legacies and what these brave men and women are remembered for now they’ve passed on. There would be innumerable stories of courage, mateship, hardship and stoic humour that were told at the wakes of these heroes.

Grandkids and great-grandkids who were unaware of just how much adversity and the perils their departed loved one faced and triumphed over simply to return home would wonder how they never knew the story behind the smile.

One such story is the previously forgotten story of my great-grandfather, Private George Leahy and the boy he smuggled out of Belgium in his kit bag in 1918. Uncovered again after exhaustive research by my sister Sonya Moon a couple of years ago, it’s a remarkable story of the Australian Identity – Bravery, a healthy disrespect for over officiousness, mateship and decency.

It garnered national attention in 2017 but so easily could have remained forgotten if not for Sonya’s determination. Here’s the story: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-16/family-discovers-fate-of-wwi-belgian-boy-smuggled-by-australians/6390646

Our generations are the lucky ones. Propped up by the sacrifices of those that came before us we are free to live and love in peace, hold differing beliefs without fear or persecution and carve out our own identity in the “lucky country”

Still, when the day comes of our own wake, what stories will be told about us? Will they be of courage and sacrifice or how we made a difference no matter how small?

How would you like to be remembered?

With our help Millingtons just asked the same question:



05
Mar

Back to the future

Well the future of my back anyway!

I spend upwards of 7 hours every day with my backside parked on a chair, looking at a computer screen and am slowly realising that things in my little home office need to change.

The concept of Ergonomics isn’t new. It was first discussed by Polish professor Wojciech Jastrzebowski in 1857 – that’s Polish as in the country Poland, not the study of Mr Sheen.

By the turn of the last century employers were starting to take the concept a bit more seriously. Most occupations were labour intensive and injury and death rates were high resulting in a lot of down time and reduced profits. Well heeled toffs were becoming slightly less well heeled toffs and something had to be done.

Work processes came under the spotlight, were reviewed and improved, restoring profits and allowing the toffs to resume buying one or two additional polo ponies a season.

Thus the OH&S industry was born and slowly evolved into the work practices we have today.

Anyway, back to my back – which is making me feel every one of my 50+ years and looks like a question mark when I eventually rise from my circa 1980 chair until it cracks like a rifle shot when I straighten up.

I’m sure if a OH&S guru came and checked out my situation they’d take me out the back and take a sledgehammer to me – arguing it’d be quicker and less painful than the damage I’m inflicting on myself.

Here comes the segue!

Or they’d take me to Flair Office Furniture and select appropriate furniture and office accessories to correct my posture. Think I prefer the second option!

The good people at Flair have been fantastic clients of Resilience Marketing for a while now and we have completed several television commercials for them as well as a corporate video.

Check them out here.

25
Feb

Alexis’s New Ride

Tasmanians are a generous lot. We punch above our weight when it comes to helping those who are temporarily, or in Alexis Downie’s case, permanently disadvantaged.

Alexis has Muscular Dystrophy, a group of muscle wasting diseases caused by inheriting some dodgy genes which cause the body to either inhibit proteins needed for normal muscle development or produce toxins that break them down.

One in a thousand people live with the condition under it’s various guises. Some are severe, tragically taking young lives early, and some such as the type I have allow people to develop symptoms later in life and only cause mid to minor disability.

One thing is for certain – they are all life altering for the person who drew the short straw and for their loved ones.

We were approached by Muscular Dystrophy Tasmania last year to help publicise their goal of providing a motorised chair for Alexis and a vehicle which was properly fitted to transport Alexis and her chair, as well as her family.

With the generosity of the wonderful John X we developed a television commercial, created a go fund me campaign, revamped their website and negotiated with Television Networks, who were also incredibly generous, to air the commercials.

That’s where you, the people of this beautiful state of ours, stepped up.

The response to Alexis and her families plight was overwhelming.

I’m getting quite emotional writing this, maybe because of my personal connection with MD, but more likely because my faith in the goodness of people has been vindicated.

The generosity of spirit, community mindedness and sense of a fair go of the Tasmanian people have allowed Muscular Dystrophy Tasmania to give Alexis’s family the keys to a purpose fitted vehicle and more importantly Alexis into a life changing chair.

You’ve changed a life and that’s no small thing.

https://www.resilience.com.au/project/muscular-dystrophy-tasmania/

18
Dec

Oops

Resilience know the value of good employees. We’ve had a lot of them over the journey and the contribution they’ve made to our business has helped turn us into one of the most recognised brands in Tasmania.

We also know that like the poor bloke on the forklift, the actions of a not so good employee can very quickly adversely affect your business irreversibly in the eyes of your customers. We’ve spent years building up good will with our clients so we’re very particular about how they are serviced and the quality of our representatives that deal with them. We need to be confident that our people are knowledgeable in their fields of expertise, have the client’s best interests at heart and represent us in a courteous and professional manner in all dealings with our customers.

Our clients Complete Workforce Solutions use the same ethos in the labour hire space. They ensure their workforce have the right skills, training and qualifications so they can hit the ground running and reduce down time on their client’s work sites. They take care of super, wages and governance to ensure a hassle free experience for their clients.

Here’s an ad we did for them a little while ago:

 

29
Nov

Merde

Pardon my French but this is a post about crap so it’s entirely appropriate!

Now I’m no Kenny but I’ve seen a fair bit of excrement over the journey, in my first job as a young man I slipped over while running sales sheets at Bridgewater Saleyards and was covered in it from head to toe. To add insult to injury I was then forced to make a humiliating 4 km walk home with dried cattle manure flaking off with every step after my lift home abandoned me at Franklin Square.

Many years later I was cleaning out a rental property after the tenants did a midnight flit, opened the door to the shed in the backyard and was greeted by an avalanche of dirty nappies pooling around my ankles. The entire shed was knee deep with them, thousands of loosely covered land mines being consumed by seemingly millions of flies and insects and a stench that to this day I can’t describe adequately.

There are other stories but in all honesty they’re crap so let’s get to the point:

Plumbing disasters and misadventures – most of us have at least one and the associated memories tend to stay with us for a long, long time.

By far and away the most unpleasant experience I’ve had with the old brown happened in 1994 when foolishly I decided to borrow an electric eel from a plumber mate and unblock my own drain.

Dave turned up, gave me a quick demonstration and scarpered. Years of experience right there! Left to my own devices it all started benignly enough, the eel was slowly heading down the pipe ready to cut through impediments like Homer Simpson through donuts. Nice warm summers day, cricket on the radio, pleasant thoughts of the steak we’d bbq later and a couple of beers to wash it down.

Then it hit! First was the sound, a high pitched whine, more of a distress call really. Not sure at that stage how the machine was supposed to react to the obstruction, I persevered and fed more cable as the head made agonisingly slow progress into the blockage. The whine got more pronounced, and then I got my first precursor of what was to come as material started exiting the pipe at and piling up a few feet away under the Rhododendron.

Somewhat naively I thought the eel would do it’s thing, punch a hole through the accumulated matter causing the blockage, water would flow again and wash the errant material away leaving me to once again read the paper in peace on the throne. What followed was an attack on the senses so severe that Vlad the Impaler would have seen it as cruel and unusual punishment.

I’ll leave the rest to your imagination – picture a mound of shiesse so big it would keep a colony of dung beetles happy for months, the accompanying smell so strong it pervaded everything and drew comments from the neighbours at every subsequent social gathering and a cable so messy that it spattered everywhere and rendered protective gloves and clothing useless. One can only dry retch so much!

I vowed then and there to never tempt the sewage gods again and whatever the cost to engage professionals for any plumbing needs I may have in the future.

Fortunately we have some great ones right here in Hobart and Sonney and the team at Ferret Pipemaster can help with blocked drains, drain maintenance and general plumbing needs all at very reasonable pricing.

Resilience have recently developed a Television Commercial and Web Site for them. You may have already seen the ad – it’s hard to forget!

Television Advertising

Web Design:

Visit Site

06
Nov

It is what it is!

Resilience Marketing have always had a strong connection to live and local music. In addition to many individual projects for local musicians we have been instrumental in the creation, promotion and event management of the For the Fallen – Standing Room Only annual events that reunited Hobary’s best bands of the 80s and packed out the Republic Bar year after year.

While the live music venues from those days – Tatts, Red Lion, Cadillac Cub, Travs, Winstons and many more may have gone the way of the dodo, 30 years on there are still a few of the musicians plying their trade successfully around the pubs and clubs of Hobart.

Any given weekend you can still find Billy Whitton, a local music icon, belting out Stray Cat Strut with as much gusto as he did with the Be Bop Brothers when they were the resident band at Tatts in the 80’s sharing their stage with members of Dire Straits after their concert at KGV.

Another local legend from that era is Tony Voglino. Tony with his band Oz Lingo played many of Hobart’s venues, always to packed houses. 30 years later Tony is still belting out tunes at venues like the Queens Head Hotel, Launceston Country Club and Paddy Waggon for a loyal following as well as being a much sought after entertainer for corporate functions and weddings. He has an amazing repertoire, borne from decades in the industry, and has recently released another album, It Is What It Is.

We were stoked when Tony approached us to develop his new web site and publicise the new album. You may have already seen the Television Advertisement which we produced and put to air recently and the web site is live and allows Tony’s fans to download his music directly.

Check out your local gig guide to catch Tony live any given weekend, you won’t be disappointed!

 

Here’s the ad and website which feature production and graphic design work by our creative staff.

Television Commercial:

 

Web Design

Visit Site: http://tonyvoglino.com/

28
Aug

Design on Track

We’re lucky here at Resilience to have many long term clients who have trusted us over the years to make a real difference to their business by getting their message out over a variety of mediums – traditional and web based.

Our awesome clients, Tasmanian Sliding Door Repairs,  are one such business who have utilised a number of our services: web design, television advertising, graphic design, magazine advertising and printing – which has raised their brand awareness and profile across a number of demographics. One of our latest projects for them was to design and print a corporate brochure outlining their Corporate and Domestic Services. We also provided an electronic version which can be emailed directly to prospective customers.

See the brochure below along with a number of projects we have completed for Tasmanian Sliding Door Repairs.

Call us today on 03 6224 6888 to enquire about our design and print services.

Print: Brochure

 

 

Branding:

logofp_Page_2

logofp_Page_3

Television Commercial:

 

Web Design:

tsdr-web

16
Jul

Welcome to a winter wonderland

I used to dread travelling to the mainland and telling people I was from Tasmania. Whilst I loved the place, I was immediately made to feel inferior through the “good natured” jokes and jibes directed at me by seemingly everyone I encountered. You know the ones – How do you spot a Tasmanian? He farts Snowflakes and Tasmania, proof that Kiwi’s can swim. Of course there was also the “family jokes” which got a bit tiresome. Tasmania was viewed as quaint at best with the majority view being somewhat less complimentary.

How times have changed. Driven by tourism, wealthy sea/tree changers and our reputation for world class art, food and wine among other things, Tasmania is seen as a must visit destination for Australians and international visitors alike. Our economy is booming, winter – which used to be a time of hibernation, is alive with festivals and events and there is a vibrancy and pride about the place unmatched anywhere else in the country.

Far from being the butt of jokes from our neighbours on the big island to the north, now a declaration that you are Tasmanian is met with outright envy and wistful looks from people yearning to visit and experience all things Tasmanian.

Playing their part in this renaissance is Tasmania Living Magazine which showcases much of what we love about our beautiful Isle and encouraging visitors to come and love it too.

Resilience Marketing have a great association with the magazine and have completed several projects for them, after all we’re proud Tasmanians too!

 

Television Commercials

Web Design

Visit Site: http://www.tasmanianliving.com.au/

30
Apr

Join the club!

The Sports Riders Club of Tasmania have been great clients for Resilience Marketing – We developed their web presence a couple of years ago, which included online membership signups and Race and Ride day entries as well as general information about the club and Sports Bike racing in general.

We’ve also developed television advertisements for them – such as the general one below and some others which have publicised specific events they have held recently.

In fact sporting clubs and community clubs are a great fit for Resilience Marketing – we are able to streamline membership processes by developing a web presence allowing members to apply and renew memberships online, book and pay for club functions and events and also keep their members up to date with what’s happening at the club through social media linked to their news section on their web site.

In addition to this we have all traditional and online media covered when it comes to advertising and publicising the club and it’s events. Can’t go wrong!

Here’s the TV commercial and website for Sports Riders club of Tasmania

Television Commercial:

 

Web Design:

webSnapShot

View Website

12
Sep

Mags and things

I had to visit my doctor this week. The dreaded dog’s disease was getting the better of me, threatening to turn into a full blown case of the man flu, which we all know is a fate undeserved for any man and much worse than the female equivalent. Settling in for what turned out to be a long wait in a room jammed with people filling tissues in plague proportions, I looked around for a magazine to read to pass the time.

My usual M.O. is to grab a National Geographic to use as cover while I sneakily slip a Take 5 or New Idea inside it to catch up with the Kardashians or tsk tsk at whatever nonsense Kanye is sprouting. Kanye is the greatest source of nonsensical quote gold since Dan Quayle. Take this gem: “I see stuff from the future, and I’m such a futurist that I have to slow down and talk in the present.”

But in this surgery there wasn’t a magazine to be seen. Nada. I looked everywhere but not even a dog eared copy of Women’s Weekly was available. I even asked the receptionist who haughtily looked down her glasses and pointed to a sign on the wall supplying that day’s WIFI code. WIFI? I remember when every medico in town had a sign on the wall demanding that people switch off their mobiles or else. Having left my mobile in the car I was forced to people watch which in a room full of infected people isn’t really a pleasant experience.

It got me thinking though – are magazines a dying medium? Are kids of today and tomorrow going to be denied the joys that I had like Spy vs Spy and folding the back cover of Mad Magazine or laughing at the idiot in a singlet and his sheep hanging off the balcony of the Ettamogah Pub in the Post Magazine?

In this day of iPads and electronic content delivery will there be a place for printed magazines?

Well judging by the range at Blackmans Bay News and Post the answer to that question is Yes!

They have thousands of titles in stock and can order in magazines that aren’t already on their racks. They also have a huge range of papers, books, cards, snacks and stationery as well as lotto, dry cleaning and Australia Post Agencies.

Far be it for us to brag (wink,wink!) but they also have great branding, television advertising and an awesome web site all developed by you know who!

Check them out below:

Television Advertising:

 

Branding and Graphic Design:

 

Web Site:

view site

04
Sep

The Malachi Crunch

Ok, so I admit it – I was a massive fan of the Brady Bunch when I was a kid. So what if they talked funny, Greg threw a football instead of kicking it and the house was adorned with wall to wall orange shag pile carpet with olive green fixtures. (So was ours btw!) The show introduced us to blended families, which sadly are the norm these days and Mike Brady was everybody’s favourite TV dad – or was he?

Challenging him for that job was the Grand Poobah of Leopard Lodge No. 462 in Milwaukee, Howard Cunningham. You see as much as I loved the Brady Bunch, Happy Days was where it was at for me. I wanted to hang at Al’s diner, eating fries and drinking soda while watching Richie, Ralph and Potsie  get up to their usual shenanigans and planning some oddball caper that always ended up with Howard dispensing some fatherly advice after it had gone south.

But I wanted to be the Fonz, not the kids in the letter jackets. I wanted to pick up girls just by holding my arms akimbo, thumbs up and saying “Ayyyy” and play music on the juke box  by thumping it in the right spot to make the right record start playing. The Fonz never paid either – just got a free ride by virtue of his coolness.

Sadly I learned that such things don’t happen in real life when attempting to emulate him in the games room at Swansea Caravan Park, our frequent school holiday destination. At the age of 12 saying Ayyy with your thumbs out just gets you quizzical looks from the girls at best, at worst finger pointing and outright laughter. Compounding my humiliation, thumping the juke box just resulted in a permanent scratch on ELO’s Dont Bring Me Down and 24 hours banishment from the Games Room by Park Management.

My favourite episode of Happy Days though was the one featuring the Malachi Crunch, a famed demolition derby move by the Malachi brothers in which they simultaneously reversed at speed into their hapless victim from opposite sides turning them into a Malachi Sandwich. Predictably the Fonz put paid to this evil manoeuvre by pulling out of the trap at the last second, resulting in the Malachi Brothers crunching each other –  thus winning the day, the girl and my undying admiration.

As they cut to the wide shot showing the vehicular carnage I remember thinking I hope they know a good panel beater.

Well, we do!

John Davidson at Eastern Autobody has been in the Smash Repair Industry for some time now and he and his fantastic team at Mornington are more than a match for the Malachi Brothers and their modern day counterparts.

Resilience Marketing have developed a TV commercial and Web Site for Eastern Autobody – check them out below:

Television Commercial:

Web Design:
eastern-autobody-web

Visit Site

 

 

 

 

20
Aug

Thank God for the Salvos

Some of my earliest memories are of the Salvation Army Band precariously placed on the narrow footpath outside our home in Dynnyrne belting out the tunes with gusto while my neighbours silenced the rattling collection tin with donations usually consisting of 1 and 2 cent pieces. They’d appear almost by magic, play four or five tunes, thank us for watching and move on to another street corner, in another street with a minimum of fuss but a maximum feeling of good will.

Of course as a young boy I wasn’t aware of who the Salvos were, the work they do for the embattled within the community, the number of people faced with homelessness, domestic violence and hunger that they help every day; or the number of lives they have turned around when despair and hopelessness seemed all that was possible. I just liked watching the tuba player go red in the face and watching the trombones slide in and out!

Fast forward more years than I would care to admit to and they are still going strong, still out there quietly doing their thing helping the next generations of the less fortunate among us, faced with new challenges such as synthetic drugs and rising rents and mortgages putting more people on the streets.

The Salvos prefer to do their work quietly and in the background but some are more visible than others. My friends and I have a very longstanding Wednesday night tradition of gathering and having a few laughs or solving the world’s problems over an ale or two at a local waterfront hotel, and not many Wednesday nights go by without old Don making an appearance, smiling and laughing with the locals, wooden collection box in hand.

Now in his 80s, Don Miller has become a Hobart institution. Week in and week out he’s out there doing the rounds of Hobart’s hotels, raising money, interacting with the community, sharing a joke or showing genuine concern for the people on his beat. He’s seemingly been around for ever and for many is the face of the Salvation Army in Hobart. There’s even a portrait of him hanging proudly over the door at the Republic Bar. Don epitomises everything that’s good about the Salvos – warm, caring, empathetic and engaging but you get the feeling that if you ever needed someone to go in to bat for you he’d be leading the charge.

Resilience Marketing have been fortunate to have a longstanding relationship with the Salvation Army, from billboards and magazine advertisements through to their latest television commercial.

Here’s a look at a couple of projects we’ve worked on:

Television Commercial:

Signage: