THE BLOG

06
Nov

The Underdog’s Lament

Walking through a market a couple of weeks ago, I came across an old toy replica of the General Lee from the Dukes of Hazzard.

I didn’t buy it but I irritated my girlfriend no end for the next three hours with Roscoe P Coltrane quotes which gave me infinitely more pleasure :). You know the ones – We’ve got ourselves a hot peeeeerseeuuuute and coo coo coo I hollered gleefully as we followed an old man with a hat on, doing 35 km/h in a circa 1960 Morris Major down Main Rd, New Town.

It dawned on me then that A. if I didn’t drop the redneck “Looosianna” accent soon I’d be single again and B. I’ve always identified with the underdog more than the hero. I don’t even remember the cast of Dukes of Hazzard other than Rosco P Coltrane and Daisy (for obvious reasons!) but I could come up with Rosco quotes ad nauseum. Apparently causing nausea at the same time if the stony silence from the passenger seat was any indication.

Some of the gems that rolled off  my tongue were ” Do you know who I am? I’m Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane and when he tells ya to scoot, he means scoot. That goes for you too you little Turban Tucker” and “Oh, he is stupid! I mean, I mean even the dipsticks call him a dipstick!” Of course I made up quite a few as well in my best Southern accent but stopped when I noticed her googling Dr. Kavorkian on her phone.

Hmm where was I?, Oh that’s right – underdogs.

I was always willing Wylie E. Coyote on, I mean it was a cartoon – why couldn’t the bloody road runner die? – They killed Kenny every week on South Park. Dick Dastardly and Mutley – destined to forever finish second and don’t get me started on Elmer Fudd, poor bugger never did get his wabbit stew!

Curiously though my favourite real life underdog was also a Roscoe – Roscoe Tanner the American tennis player with the massive left handed serve. He won an Australian Open but finished up runner up in the other majors and every other tournament of note. I was a huge tennis fan as a kid and his serve was something to behold when it wasn’t coming back at him quicker than a toupee in a hurricane. Unfortunately for him McEnroe, Connors, Vilas et al were playing in the same era so he didn’t get the chocolates all that often.

Perhaps if he had had a better coach….. nice segue into this weeks featured client. Marty Nidorfer – you guessed it – Tennis Coach!

We designed and printed a brochure for him a little while ago.

Check it out here

31
Oct

Stand Out!

At Resilience we’ve been helping business be seen for over 25 years now.

Once synonymous with the Resilience Report, a budget tv advertising and radio advertising package which helped hundreds of Tasmanian businesses showcase their products and services, Resilience helped pioneer cost effective advertising in the Tasmanian market. Hard to believe that the last Resilience Report aired 10 years ago!

We’re proud of our roots, which made us a household name in Southern Tasmania, but we’ve moved on a bit from those days now.

We are all about finding quality solutions to get our client’s message out to the market place and have added many strings to our bow in order to do this. Having evolved into a full service Advertising Agency, we take a consultative approach with our clients to find the best medium or combination of mediums to ensure their brand rises above the pack. We’ve fully embraced web technology and social media and added them to our more traditional electronic media solutions in addition to one of our fastest growing areas, outdoor advertising.

With our superscreen displaying ads 24/7 at the Elwick Showgrounds and the utilisation of traditional billboards we are literally showcasing hundreds of Tasmanian, National and International brands every day to thousands of people.

To find out how we can help your business give us a call on 03 6224 6888 or use the contact form on this site.

 

23
Oct

Releasing our inner Rock Gods!

Resilience Managing Director, Darren Roach and his wife and fellow Director, Jody attended the WIN TV Aust Connect networking event at Hamilton Island last week as guests of the WIN Network.

Apart from the formal events associated with these conferences they also got to let their hair down (literally!) and rock the night away as their alter egos, Slash and Tina Turner.

From all accounts everybody had a great night although it may take some time for the Hamilton Island Conference Centre dance floor to recover from a Tina Turner lead all in rendition of the Nutbush City Limits dance!

Resilience would like to thank WIN TV for a terrific conference, where many contacts and new business relationships were formed.

17
Oct

Here’s one for the Nay sayers!

I was an outside kid. If the sun was out – I was out. Usually with my mates on our Malvern Star 10 speeds cruising the neighborhood or staging epic cricket test matches at Parliament St. Oval until the birds’ evening chorus signaled that it was time to go home and scoff down whichever version of meat and three veg was on the plate that night.

Rainy days were a nightmare. No DVD’s, Playstations or facebook back in those days. Just books and whatever was on one of the two channels available on the box. Video Recorders were just coming in but we didn’t have one so The Secret Seven and Famous Five would become my world until the Sun came out and I could get back to clobbering Tony Grieg all over the park again. Then one year we got pong – the first tv game. Two vertical lines on each side of the screen which went up and down and a square which acted as a ball. This was the most fun you could have indoors, hey – I was 10!, and my mates and I would play it for hours or at least until the sun shone again and the Ashes could continue.

I had no idea what made it work, and I had no interest in finding out either which may have been a mistake in retrospect. Games have come a long way since pong and each successful game has created untold wealth for their creators.

Take Robert Nay for example. At the ripe old age of 14 he created a game called Bubble Ball, put it out to the world and was a millionaire before his 15th birthday. It’s been downloaded from iTunes 16 million times – 2 million times in it’s first two weeks back in 2010 earning Robert a million dollars in that fortnight alone. All because young Robert had an idea and some coding skills.

How does your 14 year old get these coding skills? Well, I’m glad you asked!

Here’s the answer – a series of live radio reads and a radio commercial organised by Resilience for Coder College.

 

Live Read

Live Read

Live Read

Commercial

 

Is your child the next Robert Nay?

 

09
Oct

A Crying in the Wind

This weeks shout out goes to Elizabeth Fleetwood, a Cornwall native who has been calling Tassie home for 35 years now so I guess we can call her a local!

Elizabeth’s book “A Crying in the Wind” is a sweeping saga, traversing over 200 years of Tasmanian History as told through the interwoven stories of four families beginning in 1812. Well researched, the book really gives you a feel for the harsh realities faced by 19th and 20th century Tasmanians and the struggle faced by our indigenous and immigrant populations.

 

Here’s a brief synopsis as written by the author:

“This epic and sweeping 200-year saga of an ancient island and its violent transformation from Eden-like paradise to the tourist-destination Tasmania of today, is told through the lives of four families.”

The Aboriginal child Tom, stolen in 1812 and forced into early adulthood with no family, no identity, and no love; the hard working Scottish Fairfield family who leave all that is familiar to establish themselves in an alien place; the convict George Turner whose gentleness and conscience are finally destroyed by hard fate; and later the Dijkstras – displaced from Java and then from the Netherlands by WWII – come seeking a new home in the fabled isle that their own Abel Tasman had discovered in 1642. 

In the wake of invasion and genocide, the remnant Aborigines struggle for bare subsistence and recognition on the remote Bass Strait Islands while the pastoral settlers build their empires on someone else’s land; the convict’s sons try to create a new identity, and the Dutch search for peace but bring memories of other wars. All of them are in an alien environment full of ghosts and strange presences.

As their descendants – ordinary people whom you might meet on the streets of Hobart today – interact around the troubled boy Ty, a threatening environmental mystery, and a fiery climax on the slopes of the grand Western Tiers, this is raw history as well as the heart-warming story of ordinary people, loving, hating and battling along in a difficult setting, indelibly marked by their past, yet striving to rise above it and seek redemption.

Well worth a read!

Resilience were approached by Elizabeth to help her market the book a little while ago now. As part of that process we have built a web site and social media presence, designed brochures and screened cinema advertisements for her.

See below:

Web Design:

cryingintthewind-web

Visit Site: http://www.acryinginthewind.com/#steps

Social Media: cryingintthewind-facebook

Visit Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/A-Crying-In-The-Wind-1844977595751627/

 

Cinema Advertising:

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-Screen1-(002)

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-Screen2-(002)

Graphic Design:

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-DL-Flyer-V3

E-Fleetwood-StateCinema-A4SETUP-DL-Flyer

29
Sep

Welcome Paul

We are very pleased to announce that Paul Wright will be joining the Resilience team as an Account Executive on Monday the 2nd of Oct

Paul is highly educated, comes with a wealth of experience in Media, National and International business. Paul will give us the ability to widen the net, reach out further than ever before and secure some amazing clientele for the agency

We are all thrilled to have him joining the team at Resilience as we continue to go from strength to strength!

 

12
Sep

Mags and things

I had to visit my doctor this week. The dreaded dog’s disease was getting the better of me, threatening to turn into a full blown case of the man flu, which we all know is a fate undeserved for any man and much worse than the female equivalent. Settling in for what turned out to be a long wait in a room jammed with people filling tissues in plague proportions, I looked around for a magazine to read to pass the time.

My usual M.O. is to grab a National Geographic to use as cover while I sneakily slip a Take 5 or New Idea inside it to catch up with the Kardashians or tsk tsk at whatever nonsense Kanye is sprouting. Kanye is the greatest source of nonsensical quote gold since Dan Quayle. Take this gem: “I see stuff from the future, and I’m such a futurist that I have to slow down and talk in the present.”

But in this surgery there wasn’t a magazine to be seen. Nada. I looked everywhere but not even a dog eared copy of Women’s Weekly was available. I even asked the receptionist who haughtily looked down her glasses and pointed to a sign on the wall supplying that day’s WIFI code. WIFI? I remember when every medico in town had a sign on the wall demanding that people switch off their mobiles or else. Having left my mobile in the car I was forced to people watch which in a room full of infected people isn’t really a pleasant experience.

It got me thinking though – are magazines a dying medium? Are kids of today and tomorrow going to be denied the joys that I had like Spy vs Spy and folding the back cover of Mad Magazine or laughing at the idiot in a singlet and his sheep hanging off the balcony of the Ettamogah Pub in the Post Magazine?

In this day of iPads and electronic content delivery will there be a place for printed magazines?

Well judging by the range at Blackmans Bay News and Post the answer to that question is Yes!

They have thousands of titles in stock and can order in magazines that aren’t already on their racks. They also have a huge range of papers, books, cards, snacks and stationery as well as lotto, dry cleaning and Australia Post Agencies.

Far be it for us to brag (wink,wink!) but they also have great branding, television advertising and an awesome web site all developed by you know who!

Check them out below:

Television Advertising:

 

Branding and Graphic Design:

 

Web Site:

view site

04
Sep

The Malachi Crunch

Ok, so I admit it – I was a massive fan of the Brady Bunch when I was a kid. So what if they talked funny, Greg threw a football instead of kicking it and the house was adorned with wall to wall orange shag pile carpet with olive green fixtures. (So was ours btw!) The show introduced us to blended families, which sadly are the norm these days and Mike Brady was everybody’s favourite TV dad – or was he?

Challenging him for that job was the Grand Poobah of Leopard Lodge No. 462 in Milwaukee, Howard Cunningham. You see as much as I loved the Brady Bunch, Happy Days was where it was at for me. I wanted to hang at Al’s diner, eating fries and drinking soda while watching Richie, Ralph and Potsie  get up to their usual shenanigans and planning some oddball caper that always ended up with Howard dispensing some fatherly advice after it had gone south.

But I wanted to be the Fonz, not the kids in the letter jackets. I wanted to pick up girls just by holding my arms akimbo, thumbs up and saying “Ayyyy” and play music on the juke box  by thumping it in the right spot to make the right record start playing. The Fonz never paid either – just got a free ride by virtue of his coolness.

Sadly I learned that such things don’t happen in real life when attempting to emulate him in the games room at Swansea Caravan Park, our frequent school holiday destination. At the age of 12 saying Ayyy with your thumbs out just gets you quizzical looks from the girls at best, at worst finger pointing and outright laughter. Compounding my humiliation, thumping the juke box just resulted in a permanent scratch on ELO’s Dont Bring Me Down and 24 hours banishment from the Games Room by Park Management.

My favourite episode of Happy Days though was the one featuring the Malachi Crunch, a famed demolition derby move by the Malachi brothers in which they simultaneously reversed at speed into their hapless victim from opposite sides turning them into a Malachi Sandwich. Predictably the Fonz put paid to this evil manoeuvre by pulling out of the trap at the last second, resulting in the Malachi Brothers crunching each other –  thus winning the day, the girl and my undying admiration.

As they cut to the wide shot showing the vehicular carnage I remember thinking I hope they know a good panel beater.

Well, we do!

John Davidson at Eastern Autobody has been in the Smash Repair Industry for some time now and he and his fantastic team at Mornington are more than a match for the Malachi Brothers and their modern day counterparts.

Resilience Marketing have developed a TV commercial and Web Site for Eastern Autobody – check them out below:

Television Commercial:

Web Design:
eastern-autobody-web

Visit Site

 

 

 

 

28
Aug

Looking for the next Webber

I must admit in all modesty that I’m a pretty dab hand on the bbq and the warmer weather is just around the corner but that’s not the type of Webber I’m talking about.

Mark Webber, 9 times Formula one grands prix winner and Tasmania Challenge founder is though. You see Mark, along with contemporaries Michael Schumaker, Sebastian Vettel, Lewis Hamilton and Fernando Alonso all started in the same way – at their local Kart track.

Karting is the perfect way for budding race drivers to hone their skills. In the main, Karts having the same amount of power, driver skill and race craft is what wins the day.

Not everybody wants to be Ayrton Senna though (yep – he was a karter too). Karting is a fun, safe way to experience motor sport and in Southern Tasmania we are lucky to have a great facility just outside of Hobart at Orielton. One of Southern Tasmania’s best kept secrets seemingly, the track is overseen by the Southern Tasmanian Kart Club who boast an impressive number of members.

Resilience were lucky enough to be approached by them to develop their web presence a little while ago. If you are interested in Karting or want more information on the Southern Tasmanian Kart Club you can contact them through their site:

View Southern Tasmanian Kart Club Site

 

20
Aug

Thank God for the Salvos

Some of my earliest memories are of the Salvation Army Band precariously placed on the narrow footpath outside our home in Dynnyrne belting out the tunes with gusto while my neighbours silenced the rattling collection tin with donations usually consisting of 1 and 2 cent pieces. They’d appear almost by magic, play four or five tunes, thank us for watching and move on to another street corner, in another street with a minimum of fuss but a maximum feeling of good will.

Of course as a young boy I wasn’t aware of who the Salvos were, the work they do for the embattled within the community, the number of people faced with homelessness, domestic violence and hunger that they help every day; or the number of lives they have turned around when despair and hopelessness seemed all that was possible. I just liked watching the tuba player go red in the face and watching the trombones slide in and out!

Fast forward more years than I would care to admit to and they are still going strong, still out there quietly doing their thing helping the next generations of the less fortunate among us, faced with new challenges such as synthetic drugs and rising rents and mortgages putting more people on the streets.

The Salvos prefer to do their work quietly and in the background but some are more visible than others. My friends and I have a very longstanding Wednesday night tradition of gathering and having a few laughs or solving the world’s problems over an ale or two at a local waterfront hotel, and not many Wednesday nights go by without old Don making an appearance, smiling and laughing with the locals, wooden collection box in hand.

Now in his 80s, Don Miller has become a Hobart institution. Week in and week out he’s out there doing the rounds of Hobart’s hotels, raising money, interacting with the community, sharing a joke or showing genuine concern for the people on his beat. He’s seemingly been around for ever and for many is the face of the Salvation Army in Hobart. There’s even a portrait of him hanging proudly over the door at the Republic Bar. Don epitomises everything that’s good about the Salvos – warm, caring, empathetic and engaging but you get the feeling that if you ever needed someone to go in to bat for you he’d be leading the charge.

Resilience Marketing have been fortunate to have a longstanding relationship with the Salvation Army, from billboards and magazine advertisements through to their latest television commercial.

Here’s a look at a couple of projects we’ve worked on:

Television Commercial:

Signage: