13
Feb

The not so humble Flattie

Some of my happiest days were spent at Swansea during school holidays as a kid. Our family were part of the temporary summer wave of “blow ins” that descended on the idyllic little town on Tassies East Coast every summer, setting up residence in our caravan which was permanently on site at the imaginatively named Swansea Caravan Park.

Long summer days were filled with beach cricket, table tennis and space invaders when it was raining, scarfing down hot buttered buns straight out of the oven from the local bakery and riding bikes with the posse all over town and beyond.

My favourite thing to do though was to get out on the water in Great Oyster Bay with my old man in his tinnie and fish for flathead. Back in those days if you put a line in with three hooks on it you’d pull in three fish and have three others chasing them up as you reeled it in. Most of the time there were a few of us in the boat, my sisters and brother often came out too which was great but I cherished the times it was just me and Dad drifting quietly in a comfortable silence while we waited for the next bite.

It wasn’t always beer and skittles though, sometimes the weather would come up unexpectedly and the gentle swell that had been lulling me into an almost hypnotic state would turn quickly into something more akin to a wave pool and result in a white knuckle ride back into shore. Or the time the engine wouldn’t start and the old man had to row from Dolphin Sands back to Swansea, a feat that to this day remains vivid in my memory.

It was a good feeling chowing down on barbecued Flathead fillets in the evening with the family knowing that I had helped put food on the table.

These days the humble Flathead, once considered the rat of the sea (albeit a tasty one!) are a lot harder to find and sell for upwards of $55/kg. The days of reeling them in as easily as shelling peas are long gone and the locals that know how and where to find them guard their secret spots jealously.

Of course to grab a few you need a boat, which is my segue into this weeks featured client – Mariner Aluminium Custom Boats.

A family business, based in Murdunna south east of Hobart, They manufacture and refit quality Aluminium Boats for domestic and commercial use.

Resilience redesigned their logo, designed and printed their stickers and developed a web site for them. check them out below:

 

 

Logo Design

Graphic  Design

Stickers:

Web Design

Visit Site: http://marineraluminiumboats.com.au/